15 Great English Words We Should All Be Using More Often

15 Great English Words We Should All Be Using More Often

Make today the day you improve your vocabulary and read on for 15 great English words we should all be using more often.

 

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I love this word and use it all the time. The coffee I just bought; the queue at the ATM; that newsreader’s hairdo – all abominable.

 

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At first this word meant anything that occurred before The Flood, Genesis 7, 8. in the Bible but now just means really, really old.

 

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I honestly thought this was something to do with a respiratory disease.

 

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This is one of those words I’ve heard people use on TV and in films without ever really fully understanding what it meant. Now that I do understand, I intend to use it relentlessly.

 

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You know that bit at the end of an Agatha Christie novel where Miss Marple or Poirot or whoever explains to everyone what the hell has been going on? That’s a denouement.

 

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I’m just dying to slip this word into a conversation. Can we replace ex- with erstwhile, as in ‘ah, quick, hide, my erstwhile boyfriend just walked in’?

 

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I hope this article does not have a fugacious hold on your interest.

 

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See also: an absolutely non-scary horror film with Patrick Wilson.

 

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To be used after watching a film/play with someone you want to impress.

 

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Or, I dunno, hope?

 

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Another personal favourite here, nemesis can be used in any circumstance to describe whatever it is that’s making your life feel challenging. In a single day I have referred to the number 22 bus, Donald Trump and my next door neighbour’s cat as my nemesis and meant it.

 

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I need to get a little more obsequiousness in my life.

 

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A throw-back to the days before text was cheap.

 

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‘Be careful, those stairs are quite precipitous.’ You can have that one for free.

 

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Vagary comes from the Latin vagary, meaning ‘to wander’ and is an altogether nicer word than its close cousin ‘vagrant’ which means ‘hobo’, basically.

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